Wednesday, February 2, 2022

#IWSG: Battling the Beasts of Life, a mom lecture

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IWSG: a place where writers and friends share woes or hugs.
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Thank you, Joylene Nowell Butler, Jacqui Murray, Sandra Cox, and Lee Lowery for hosting this month's IWSG!

February's question is: Is there someone who's supported you that isn't in your life anymore that you miss?

Thank you for the prompt, but I will write on dredging up creative intuition today.


The other night, one of my children lamented how they were unable to create fantastical depths compared to the authors they admire. To their frustration, they've worked on the same novel for over four years. They're frustrated as to why they struggle to move forward, why they're constantly rehashing the same scenes.


They resent the mom talk as they believe a direct solution was obvious, but I knew how to approach the disconnect.



Their struggles stem from real-life expectations. They fight against harmonizing their mind with reality. How does a person do that? Well, I pointed out how often seeking routes of escapism, covering the deep wounds with denial, impacts all facets of life. Their psyche and creative abilities are smothered by refusing to recognize real-life; from knowing how to confront issues to battling them down. It's a good start that they recognize what these issues are, though.

With so much distraction involved, problem-solving skills take a huge step back, which is the part of the thought process that leads to the pathway to creativity!

If they dig deep and confront the real-life monster issues and find and apply solutions without giving up, their creative flow will open wide. Accepting and recognizing the fact that nothing will change unless they do something about it will empower them. The results are that they will experience freedom from these fears and enjoy the drive to create!


Denying a part of yourself extends far into the pathways of how you reflect, which directly influences creative output.





How do you deal with real-life problems? Do you feel that there is a connection with how you're battling real beasts versus those you create in your books?








14 comments:

  1. I hope that helped your young writer child.
    If it's a real-life problem I can do nothing about, I don't worry about it.

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  2. What a great example of the creative process, Elizabeth! Writing requires understanding and it's in that search for knowledge that we find our way.

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    1. It isn't easy, and lots of work, but imagine the dam that breaks once its conquered?

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  3. I have to admit: most times I run away from my problems. Only when I don't have a choice, like in a case of serious illness, I accept the situation and deal with it as best as I can. Otherwise, I find it easier to avoid my troubles. Does it isolate me from people? Yes, to a degree. Does it impact my creativity? I don't think so. Mostly I find my inspiration for writing in art and literature, not in real life. But then, I write speculative fiction - pure escapism. My heroes do deal with their problems, heroically too, while I cringe in my corner and cheer them up. They are much braver than myself. It is easy to be brave in fiction.

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    1. So true! Yes. I find great joy and escapism as well. It is very cathartic.

      As with the instance my son is enduring--he has a cognative dissonance that is showing up in his thinking. I just thought to share this in case someone is feeling the same thing as he.

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  4. So true that we have to take control of changing ourselves when we're confronting problems. It depends on what problems I'm trying to solve on how I'd handle solving it.

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  5. This is really great advice. I find it difficult to write when I have a lot going on in the real world. I can become emotionally blocked or overly critical of my work. However, sometimes writing can help me work through my real-life problems.

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    1. You're so right! Writing has always served as an escapism and is cathartic! It's a wild circle!

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  6. Lovely thoughts on creative intuition.
    Problem-solving depends on the actual problem - and whether it's internally or externally sourced, as well as the intensity thereof and whether it's potentially life-threatening...

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  7. Your comments remind me of the battle I fought with my writing to write the stories that dug deep yet that sidestepped abuse issues coming from my childhood. It took massive work to recognize my flawed characters and to rebuild a more positive outcome, but the work was a healing process. Today, I feel comfortable working on several levels of characters' inner lives without getting stuck on negative stereotypes. I hope your comments help open up new directions for your kids!

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    1. I'm glad to hear that writing has helped you grown. What a wonderfully healing process! It's been the same with me--I had a rough childhood and struggled through my marriage. Writing helps to get it "out there".

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